Cottage - townland of Killererin

Killererin - A Parish History

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Killererin - A Parish History

Cottage, Cotáiste,[1] “‘Cottage”

The townland of Cottage is situated in the east central part of the Parish of Killererin in the Barony of Clare. It is bordered on the north by Tigreenaun, on the west by the Barony of Tiaquin and the townland of Knock and on the south and east by Hillsbrook Demesne. The Down Survey 1656-1658, records the townland as ‘Knocknadrough’. In Cottage in 1641, the owners were listed as Bourke, Richard (Catholic) and in 1670 Kirwan, Martin (Protestant)[2]. The townland of Cottage was also known locally as ‘Illaune’ and older members of the community would have used this name more readily in times past.

O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1830

According to O’Donovan’s Field Name Books 1830, early reference to Cottage which is a standard name was found in the Boundary Survey Sketch maps, completed during the Place Name Survey (which began in 1824) and officiated by John O’Donovan (1806-1861). There is another reference to Cottage cited by Connor Warde (Steward).[3] The townland is described as the property of J. Kirwan, Esq., Hillsbrook, and contained 148¾ statute acres including about 60 acres of bog with an annual valuation of £47 8s 0d[4].

Census 1841-1851[5]

There were 50 people living in the townland of Cottage in 8 houses in 1841. By 1851, there was 1 house uninhabited and 43 people were living in 7 houses.[6] According to the 1837-1842 OS map there was no through road into the village.

Griffith’s Valuation 1855[7]

John A. Kirwan owned all of the land in the townland of Cottage in 1855. The following leased their lands and houses from the landlord: William Gibbon, leased 4 acres, 1 rood and 8 perches of cut-away bog, at an annual valuation of £0 5s 0d; Patrick Farrington, Michael Healy and Patrick Lyons, leased their houses, out-offices and lands totalling in all 40 acres, 2 roods and 28 perches between them. The same Patrick Farrington, had an annual valuation on his property of £5 10s 0d. The other 2 households had an annual valuation of £2 15s 0d. Martin Fleming had a house and 6 acres, 3 roods and 13 perches at an annual valuation of £2 10s 0d. This was sub-let to him by Conor Warde, (Steward). Patrick Connell leased 2 acres, 3 roods and 14 perches, also sublet by the same Conor Warde with an annual valuation of £0 15s 0d. John A. Kirwan kept 25 acres 3 roods and 0 perches of bog for himself at an annual valuation of £0 3s 0d. Henry Campbell leased the gate-lodge and 12 acres, 2 roods of land with an annual valuation of £9 10s 0d. Bridget Gill had a house and garden of 1 rood 10 perches, with an annual valuation of £0 5s 0d. Conor Ward held 55 acres 3 roods 2 perches for himself at an annual valuation of  £23 0s 0d.

Census 1861-1881[8]

There were 32 people living in the townland in 1861 in 7 houses. In 1871, there were 33 people living in 6 houses and in 1881 the population increased to 41, living in 6 houses. The total area of land remained the same as in 1841, with the valuation £47 8s 0d.

Census 1891[9]

There were 7 houses with a population of 35 in Cottage in 1891.

1901 Census[10]

There were 27 people living in 4, 2nd class houses in the townland of Cottage in 1901. This was a small Clachan Settlement to be found on the road leading from Barnaderg in a northerly direction towards Hillsbrook. The houses would have been very close together such as was the tradition at the time. All of the houses were 2nd class with 3 windows to the front. They all had out-buildings. This townland was the same as others in the area, with families working on the small plots of land and cutting turf to provide fuel for a fire on which all of the cooking was done. This would have been an open hearth fire and it would provide warmth for the family.

Mary Farrington – Head of Household

The heads of households recorded were Mary Farrington, a widow aged 51, and a farmer. She had 2 sons and 2 daughters living with her: James aged 22 years, Michael aged 20, Bridget aged 18 and Ellen aged 19, all of whom were unmarried.

Edward Lyons – Head of Household

Edward Lyons aged 40, and a farmer, was married to Mary aged 30. They had 5 daughters: Mary aged 11, Kate aged 9, Ellen aged 8, Bridget aged 6, Maggie aged 5 and 1 son Patrick aged 3.

John Hynes – Head of Household

John Hynes, aged 58, was married to Ellen aged 56. They had 3 sons and 2 daughters living with them; Patrick aged 33, Peter aged 22, Margaret aged 21, Ellen aged 18 and Thomas aged 15, all unmarried.

Denis Shaughnessy – Head of Household

Denis Shaughnessy aged 64, was a widower and a farmer. His son, William aged 38, lived with him. William was married to Mary aged 33 and they had 3 children: Honor aged 6, Denis aged 2 and Michael T. aged 6 months.  Another grandchild Thomas Donlon, an agricultural labourer, aged 20, also lived in this household.

1911 Census[11].

There were 32 people living in 4 houses listed in the 1911 census. These included the following heads of households: James Farrington, Denis Shaughnessy, John Hynes and Mary Lyons.

James Farrington – Head of Household

James Farrington aged 33, was a farmer, and single. His brother Michael aged 31, lived with him, as well as his sisters; Bridget aged 29 and Ellen aged 21, all unmarried.

Denis Shaughnessy – Head of Household

Denis Shaughnessy aged 78, was a widower and a retired farmer. He lived with his son, William aged 47 who was married to Mary aged 45. They had 7 children: Norah aged 16, Dennis aged 12, Michael Timothy aged 9, Patrick aged 8, Mary Delia aged 7, Maggie aged 5 and William aged 2 who lived with them in this house. Also listed in this household was Thomas Donlon aged 35. He was Denis Shaughnessey’s grandson and listed as a farm servant.

John Hynes – Head of Household

John Hynes aged 75, was a farmer and married to Ellen aged 71. They lived with their 2 sons and 3 grandchildren. Their sons were: James aged 38 and Peter aged 34, and both were single. Their granchildren were: William Henry aged 12, John aged 11 and James Michael aged 9.

Mary Lyons – Head of Household

Mary Lyons was a widow aged 43. She had 8 children: Ellen aged 18, Bridget aged 16, Margaret aged 15, Patrick aged 13, Bernard aged 9, Sarah aged 7, and Norah aged 4.  Also living with her was a married daughter, Mary Hynes aged 21.  Mary had a child, also named Mary aged 1.

1991-2006 Census[12]

The graph below shows the changes in population in this townland between 1841 and 2006 according to census information.

Mapping Change[13]

The Farrington name dates back to 1855 according to Griffith’s Valuation. The present day descendant of Patrick Farrington, Carl Morrissey, owns the plot mentioned in Griffith’s Valuation. This is the oldest name to survive and connected to the village. It has only changed name through marriage. Carl and his family live in Knock, an adjoining townland. Denis Shaughnessy was listed in the 1901 census and the Shaughnessy family still live in Cottage today.

John Hynes was also listed in the 1901 census and his descendants, the Hynes family still live in the village. The remains of the Warde’s house are still visible to the east of the townland, although now in ruins and the name of Conor Warde is listed in Griffith’s Valuation 1855, which dates the ruins. It became known as Jack McHugh’s (Jackeen’s) in later years as he had lived there for some time with his aunt who is believed to be Catherine Warde. To the southeast of the townland and adjoining Hillsbrook, there was a road which led to the Warde household.

Ordnance Survey Map 1837 – 1842

In the Ordnance Survey map 1837-1842, it shows that there was a road going through the townland of Cottage as we know it today and this road led to Barnaderg, but there was no road going into the village itself and people would have had to travel through the fields.[14] Today, there is a road leading to the village; the townland itself has a growing community of young people and new houses.

 

 

 

[1] Placenames Database of Ireland (www.logainm.ie)
[2] Trinity College, Dublin, ‘The Down Survey’ (http://downsurvey.tcd.ie/landowners.)
[3] Galway County Library, ‘O’Donovan’s Field Name Books’ (www.places.galwaylibrary.ie) (July 2011)
[4] ibid
[5]‘Table V11-Area, Out-offices and Farm Steadings and Population together with the Valuation of Each Parish, Townland and Township of the County of Galway in 1881’ (James Hardiman Library, National University of Ireland, Galway, p38) (July 2011)
[6] Ordnance Survey Statistics Office, ‘25” Historical Map 1988-1913’ (www.os.ie/publicviewer) (July 2011)
[7] Ask about Ireland, ‘Griffith’s Valuation’ (http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index (July 2011)
[8] ‘Table V11- Area, Out-offices and Farm Steadings and Population together with the Valuation of Each Parish, Townland and Township of the County of Galway in 1881’(James Hardiman Library, National University of Ireland, Galway, p38)
[9] Census of Ireland for the Year 1911[Province of Connaught, County of Galway] Area, Houses and Population, ‘Table VII-Area Houses Outbuildings-Buildings and Farm Steadings, and Population together with the Valuation of Each Poor Law Union, Dispensary District, Electoral Division, Townland in the County of Galway in 1911’ (Galway County Library, p110)
[10] The National Archives of Ireland, ‘Census Ireland 1901/1911’,(http://www.census.nationalarchives./)
[11] ibid
[12] Central Statistics Office, (www.cso./census/reports) (July 2011)
[13] Local information (Feb 2012)
[14] Galway County Library, ‘1842 Ordnance Survey Maps’(http://places.galwaylibrary.ie/maps (Feb 2012)

This page was added on 02/06/2024.

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